Dr Kevin Gurney



ABOUT


I am a professor at Northern Arizona University. My training is in atmospheric science, ecology and public policy. I currently research topics in carbon cycle science, climate science, and climate science policy.

My recent projects involve simulation of the global carbon cycle using the inverse approach, quantifying fossil fuel CO2 from the building to global scale (the "Hestia", "Vulcan" and "FFDAS" projects), the relationships between US energy demand/supply and climate change, the linkages between terrestrial carbon exchange and climate variability, and the impacts of deforestation on climate. I also have worked extensively on climate policy and have been involved, for over 20 years, with the United Nations Climate Change Framework Convention and the Kyoto Protocol. In addition to carbon cycle science and policy, I have worked on stratospheric ozone depletion, radionuclide dose assessment, energy systems modeling, and climate-economic modeling.

CURRICULUM VITAE
 

PROJECTS

 
  • Date
    03/21/2016
    The Vulcan project has achieved the quantification of the 2002 U.S. fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the scale of individual factories, powerplants, roadways and neighborhoods on an hourly basis.
  • Date
    03/09/2016
    Information regarding where the world’s power plants are located and how much each one is emitting is not well-known outside of the US and a handful of industrial countries.
  • Date
    03/21/2016
    A key component in the projection of future global change is the ability to predict future concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2).
  • Date
    03/09/2016
    Hestia will quantify, simulate and visualize the metabolism of greenhouse gas emitting activity down to the building and street level.
  • Date
    03/09/2016
    As an assimilation system, FFDAS generates both an estimate of emissions at the gridcell level and an accompanying uncertainty estimate.
  • Date
    07/15/2016
    A key component in the projection of future global change is the ability to predict future concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2).